Resilience

Have you ever observed that the same thing can happen to different people, yet the effect on each person is dramatically different? Have you ever wondered why it is that one of the people will collapse under the set back, and the other person will get knocked back for a while and then seem to thrive? While some people naturally seem to display more resilience than others, the good news is that you can develop it by using strengths that you already possess.

Having resilience is the ability to interpret the setback as short-term, isolated and not permanent. This means that a resilient person believes they can move on by applying any learning found in the situation without being trapped into inaction. It is a certainty that unexpected and unwanted stressors will arrive in your life. Being resilient enough to deal with these situations will make the difference in how quickly you can get back on your feet again. We can't control many difficult situations, but we do have control over how we view the experiences and how we view our own capabilities to deal with them. Using this toolkit, you will be able to see the way that overall heath will support your resilience, and you will be able to examine ways to increase your current resilience, helping you to bounce back from adversity faster and more effectively.

  • The attributes of resilience
  • Why resilience is important
  • The attributes of mindfulness
  • Ways to increase your resilience.

Planning wellbeing worksheet

This is a component of the Resilience toolkit. Using the Maori health model Te Whare Tapa Wha (used with permission from Ministry of Health, 2012) we can check whether we are allocating enough time to the various parts of our lives that increase well-being. If we don't spend enough time on all four areas of our health, we can become 'unbalanced' and will find it difficult to have enough energy to act in a resilient way.

Resilience

This is the main component of the Resilience toolkit. Those who recover and grow quickly following a stressful event exercise resilience. Having resilience is the ability to interpret a setback as short-term, isolated and not permanent. This means that a resilient person believes that they can move on by applying any learning found in the situation and are not stuck in the situation. While some people naturally seem to display more resilience than others, the good news is that you can develop it by using strengths that you already possess.

Resilience flyer

Find out what the toolkit is about and what you will learn from it.

Case studies

Merging cultures

This case study is a component of LDC's toolkits, Leading through change, and Resilience. It provides LDC alumni leadership experiences. You can use the case study to help think about your own leadership practice.

Courage in the face of adversity

This case study is a component of the Resilience toolkit, to provide LDC alumni leadership experiences. You can use the case study to help think about your own leadership practice.

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